Students optimistic about revocation of Rose’s degree after University committee drafts new procedure

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Memberships of the Leadership Coalition for Speak up Sewanee encouraged students and faculty to boycott the gown until the revocation of Rose’s honorary degree. From left to right: Brandon Iracks-Edelin (C’18), Eliana Perozo (C’18), Bernadette Hartsough (T’20), Claire Brickson (C’18), Cotie San (C’18), and Sydney Peterson (C’18). Photo by Lucy Wimmer (C’20).

By Fleming Smith

Editor-in-Chief

The University Senate’s honorary degrees committee has drafted a procedure for the revocation of honorary degrees in the wake of protests over Charlie Rose’s 2016 degree from Sewanee. The procedure awaits approval from the Senate and the Board of Regents, but many students hope that the Board of Regents will soon make a decision in light of this new development.

The honorary degrees committee consists of five members in addition to the Regents: Professors Bran Potter, Pamela Macfie, and Mishoe Brennecke (C’84), as well as Dean of the College Terry Papillon and Dean of the School of Theology Neil Alexander. The group drafted the procedure for revoking honorary degrees in the course of 10 days after the Senate’s meeting on February 26.

“I’m hopeful that by the end of break, we’ll have answers to a lot of our questions. We worked hard to get these procedures out…we’ve accelerated all of these processes because this is a time-sensitive matter,” Potter told The Purple.

Although many students hope a decision will be made to revoke before spring break begins, Potter was not as optimistic, commenting, “I would not say that you’ll have absolute clarity before spring break.”

However, he added, “I’m very optimistic that we’ll have a definitive answer in the timeliest manner possible.” Potter explained that the college faculty and Senate have made their opinions clear; after the University Senate voted unanimously to recommend revocation of the degree, the college faculty voted to endorse their recommendation that same week, not unanimously but “overwhelmingly in agreement,” according to professors.

Regarding the procedures currently under review, Potter said, “Ultimately, the procedures can be used short-term and long-term. The most significant thing I see right now is that we have a procedure.” Before this semester, no such procedure existed, as Sewanee has never revoked an honorary degree.

Potter clarified that “any set of procedures would develop with the expectation that this would be a very unusual event…with the expectation that the procedure would not necessarily be driven by a single case.”

Neither the Senate nor the Board of Regents has yet released their opinion on the procedure.

At a recent meeting hosted by the Leadership Coalition for Speak Up Sewanee, more than 80 students, seminarians, faculty members, community members, and administrators gathered to review the actions already taken in protest against the Board of Regents’ decision to maintain Rose’s honorary degree on February 15 and to plan the next steps.

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Members of the Leadership Coalition organized and spoke at a protest against the Board of Regents’ decision to maintain Rose’s honorary degree on February 22. Photo by Matt Hembree (C’20).

The Coalition emphasized that in under a month, more than 11 open letters have been published, many in The Purple, all in favor of revocation. Brandon Iracks-Edelin (C’18), a Coalition member and president of the Student Government Association (SGA), shared SGA’s data from a recent survey: out of 763 students, making up 43 percent of the student body, 640 students opposed the Regents’ decision, while 72 were in favor and 51 students had no opinion.

The Leadership Coalition has begun work on a list of demands for the administration. While the list does call for the revocation of Rose’s degree, it includes many other demands, such as a general education requirement focusing on classes that study social inequalities and diversity; increasing student representation on the Board of Trustees; a student commons; increased transparency regarding crime statistics on campus, especially hate crimes; and the addition of more diverse voices in Title IX processes.

At the meeting, the Leadership Coalition appeared hopeful that the community would soon hear news from the Board of Regents regarding the honorary degree. “It is my understanding that [the Board of Regents] will be meeting soon and will be discussing this, and will come up with a decision, but we don’t know what that decision is going to be,” said Claire Brickson (C’18), a member of the Coalition and a student trustee who originally presented revocation to the Board.

The Coalition said that they will be meeting with the Chair of the Board, Joseph DeLozier (C’77), this afternoon, March 12.

Although The Purple reached out to several members of the Board, none would comment, and some members stated that the Board “speaks with one voice” and has agreed not to talk publicly on this matter.

After a letter from Vice-Chancellor John McCardell to the student body on February 27, many students believed that the degree had already been revoked. The Coalition stressed that no new decision has yet been made public.

“Until we all receive an e-mail, and it’s not just conversations like this or between higher-ups, but until all students receive an e-mail that says the degree has in fact been revoked, we are still protesting, and we are still boycotting the gown,” said Coalition member Eliana Perozo (C’18).

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More than 200 students, faculty, staff, seminarians, and community members protested on February 22, many making a pledge to boycott the gown. Photo by Matt Hembree (C’20).

Some confusion arose at the meeting regarding which group would have a final decision on whether a degree could be revoked. Perozo commented to the audience that “we are hoping that over time, the Board of Regents are not the only people that are allowed to make these decisions.”

Professor Paul Holloway then stood up from the audience and addressed attendees to offer his perspective as a member of the University Senate. “To say that the final decision lies with the Regents is to misrepresent it,” he explained, adding that this was not a misrepresentation by the students present, but perhaps had been explained to them incorrectly.

Holloway emphasized that the Senate still possesses authority in these situations and encouraged attendees to read Ordinances 17 and 19, which address the roles of the Senate and the issue of honorary degrees.

Sewanee resident Lynne Vogel (C’75), one of the first women to register at Sewanee, told The Purple she came to the Coalition’s meeting because “I saw a committed group of young people refusing to back down from injustice, well-organized and committed to positive, organic cultural change.”

She added, “And as a member of the Sewanee community, I wanted to see if there was a possibility of bridging town and gown. The call for transparency is knock on this door. Thank you for all you are doing to create a better, truer Sewanee.”

One comment

  1. “The Coalition emphasized that in under a month, more than 11 open letters have been published, many in The Purple, all in favor of revocation.” But see, http://bit.ly/2IooX3I where the following text appears:

    “Let’s Reclaim EQB

    Published on February 27, 2018

    Thomas (Tom) Whitaker, Jr., JD, FCEP

    …spend some time meditating on The Sewanee King Jesus Window…

    This past Friday, I presented a breakout session at the Kingdom Advisors Annual Conference in Champions Gate near Orlando on the topic Planned Giving’s Role in Biblical Stewardship: A Modern Day Joseph’s Strategy. One of the slides in our Powerpoint introduced the topic with the question whether the notion of Christian financial advisors and Christian estate planning attorneys collaborating was just a dream or whether it was our destiny whose time has come. (The theme of the conference was “Prepared”).

    The answer lies in the definition of what it means to truly dwell together in “unity.” The Founders of The University of the South clearly knew the answer as established in their choice of Psalm 133:1 as the source of the school’s motto: “Behold, how good and pleasant it is for brethren to dwell together in unity!”…shortened to the Latin title of the Psalm, Ecce Quam Bonum (EQB), which appears in the Seal of the University (see above).

    The short answer is that the Founders spoke of organic unity instead of organizational uniformity. In order to “behold”, the beholdee has to be visible for the beholder to envision. In order to be “brethren”, there has to be a shared progenitor. Dwell connotes ongoing shared abode. In order to be a part of an organic unity, one has to be of the same “stuff” organically. Simply ascribing to a set of shared values, no matter how lofty or noble they may be, does not a family create.

    The true brethren/sistren are those who are in a living and loving personal relationship with God Almighty, through Jesus Christ His Son. The Spirit of EQB is the overflow from the lives of those Christ Followers in community under the influence of the Holy Spirit who are about Our Father’s business on The Mountain and beyond. His work far exceeds jealously guarding the purity of Honorary Degrees from the taint of ex post facto discovered character flaws, misdeeds, and sins committed by the recipients of those hallowed sheepskins.

    EQB is far more than the ethereal protocols that are ostensibly self-evident so as to not require definition to be understood. EQB is far more than a sound-bite to justify the retention OR the stripping of an honorary degree from a degree recipient. If the notion of EQB is separated from the Father of the brethren Whose grace is the only source of true goodness and pleasantness, then we are left with a mere wisp without substance that can be used to justify any type of agenda with a gloss of goodness.

    Once the honorary degree has been bestowed, it is a completed gift. The University initiated the gift, so no application was made by the recipient. By what authority can the recipient be forced to disgorge the degree? I suggest that the Regents, Trustees, Administration, Faculty, and Students ALL have bigger fish to fry beyond whether or not Charlie Rose’s honorary degree be symbolically stripped away. The same goes for the comparable Theolog groups, Honor Council alumni, other alumni, and outside interlopers.

    Let’s reclaim true EQB by fixing our gaze on The Author and Finisher of Our Faith, and then being about our Father’s business on The Mountain and beyond. A place to start is to spend some time meditating on The Sewanee King Jesus Window at the front of All Saints Chapel when on Campus. (https://www.facebook.com/sewaneekin…)

    Let’s also guard against anyone coopting EQB to reduce it to merely “honor” in order to redefine the Spirit of EQB as something it is not. A version that does not need God, is actually hostile to Christianity, and leads The University of the South in the wrong direction a la Harvard.”

    3.12.18 This member of the Class of 1975 would repeat: “Once the honorary degree has been bestowed, it is a completed gift. The University initiated the gift, so no application was made by the recipient. By what authority can the recipient be forced to disgorge the degree? I suggest that the Regents, Trustees, Administration, Faculty, and Students ALL have bigger fish to fry beyond whether or not Charlie Rose’s honorary degree be symbolically stripped away. The same goes for the comparable Theolog groups, Honor Council alumni, other alumni, and outside interlopers.”

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